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Barnaby Joyce defends leaked texts amid France and Australia’s submarines row



Barnaby Joyce has launched an extraordinary defence of the decision to leak text messages between Scott Morrison and the French president.

Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce has leapt to defend Prime Minister Scott Morrison as the diplomatic row between Australia and France over the axed submarines deal escalates.

Text messages between the two world leaders were sensationally leaked to the media on Monday night in an attempt to discredit French President Emmanuel Macron’s position after he accused Mr Morrison of lying.

Mr Joyce on Wednesday claimed that leaking text messages from a foreign leader was “not as extraordinary” as calling another foreign leader “a liar when they’re not”.

“We had a major political leader call the Prime Minister of Australia a liar and you can’t do that, diplomatically,” he told the ABC.

“You can’t go around calling other leaders of other countries a liar.

“Not (the leader of) a great nation of France. Some tin pot nation in the middle of nowhere, well, I suppose you can say what you like.”

Mr Joyce said the government had been looking at “contingency plans” well before the $90bn submarine contract with France was scrapped in favour of a pact with the US and the UK.

Mr Macron told Australian reporters at a summit in Rome at the weekend that he “knew” Mr Morrison had lied to him over the severing of the contract.

Mr Morrison subsequently denied his account. But just hours later, the text messages emerged, which are believed to have been strategically released to outlets via his office.

French ambassador Jean-Pierre Thebault earlier on Wednesday accused Mr Morrison of stabbing Paris in the back.

In a major speech to the National Press Club, Mr Thebault said the relationship between the two countries had sunk to a “new low”.

“The deceit was intentional,” Mr Thebault said earlier, as he unloaded on the Prime Minister in a room full of reporters.

“The way it was handled was plainly a stab in the back.

“What, after such events, can any partner of Australia now think, is the value of Australia’s signature?”

Asked if he believed the Prime Minister was “lying about lying”, Mr Thebault replied: “Yes, he was … I have several examples”.

“Maybe there’s a difference between misleading and lying.

“But, you know, among heads of states and governments, when you mislead a friend and an ally, you lie to him.”

He added the release of the text messages signalled Australia could not be trusted.

“You don’t behave like this on personal exchanges of leaders. Doing so also sends a very worrying signal for all heads of state,” the French ambassador said.

“Beware, in Australia there will be leaks. And what you say in confidence to your partners will be eventually used and weaponised against you one day.”

But in a press conference following the ambassador’s speech, Mr Morrison expressed his desire to end the spat, which has dominated headlines over the past week.

“Claims had been made and those claims were refuted,” he said during a stopover in Dubai.

“I don’t think there’s any further profit for anyone in continuing down this path.”

Earlier in the week, Mr Macron raised doubts over whether the AUKUS agreement would even deliver the proposed nuclear powered submarines in a timely manner: “Good luck”.

Echoing his comments, the French ambassador accused Australia of “magical thinking”.

Mr Thebault’s address is the first time he has publicly spoken since being recalled as ambassador following the announcement of the AUKUS agreement.

While he promised France would always stand with Australia, he cautioned against the government using “cheap words and promises of love”.

“We won’t any more buy on cheap words. We won’t buy on promises of love.

“At the same time … this is a golden opportunity. We can rebuild something substantial. But we start from very far away.”

But should Mr Morrison apologise? The ambassador sidestepped the question.

“Eating one share of humble pie may sometimes be difficult. It’s up to everyone to make his own decision,” he said.

Asked if he would follow the ambassador’s advice, Mr Morrison said he would never offer an apology to France for tearing up the agreement.

“Australia made the decision not to go ahead with the contract for a submarine that was not going to do the job that Australia needed to do.

“I’ll never make any apologies for that decision.”

Originally published as ‘Tinpot nation’: Barnaby Joyce defends leaked text messages over France subs row

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Domino’s Pizza commits to net zero by 2050, details huge expansion plans



Domino’s Pizza has joined a growing number of major companies making the carbon emission pledge, while also outlining expansion plans.

Domino’s Pizza is pushing ahead with massive expansion plans and joined the growing number of companies committed to net zero emissions by 2050.

The company has also warned it expects to be faced with higher food and energy costs next year.

The fast food behemoth held its annual general meeting and provided a trading update on Wednesday.

Chief executive Don Meij said its network was already 15 per cent bigger than this time last year through new store openings and acquisitions.

There are 3169 stores in the network and the plan is to more than double that number by next decade.

“We have a busy new store pipeline and this year, we aim to open a record number of new stores,” Mr Meij said.

“Indeed, we are targeting FY22 to be the largest expansion of our store footprint in our company’s history.

“We also remain active in pursuing additional markets.”

Over the next three to five years, Domino’s is targeting 9-12 per cent new store growth, and chairman Jack Cowan gave more detail in his speech to investors.

“Where other businesses in our category or broader industry immediately went on the defensive when Covid-19 arrived, Domino’s Pizza Enterprises expanded our presence – opening more stores, marketing to more customers, donating more meals to the community,” Mr Cowan said.

“With the acquisition of Taiwan, our tenth market, and a review of our modelling, Domino’s now expects to operate more than 6650 stores by 2030.

“We foresee significant upside beyond 2033 in our existing businesses, particularly Europe and Asia.”

Mr Meij said the network in both regions were “planned to be bigger than the entire Domino’s Pizza Enterprises of today”.

Mr Meij said Domino’s would, in the next 12 months, set time-bound and science-based targets with an interim goal and a commitment to reach net zero greenhouse gas emissions before 2050.

“We are embracing this responsibility to take action now, and inspire our industry and supply chain partners.”

He said Domino’s would partner with Compassion in World Farming on the company’s Better Chicken Commitment, expanding its pledge for Europe to include Australia and New Zealand.

“We have also expanded our offerings to vegan, vegetarian and flexitarian customers, with plant-based cheeses and alternatives to our traditional proteins,” Mr Meij said.

On expected higher food prices in 2022, Domino’s said long term contracts would provide some buffer.

Shareholder activist Stephen Mayne asked Mr Cowan, aged 79, whether he planned to emulate the boss of the publisher of this title – News Corp chairman Rupert Murdoch – in continuing his career into his 90s.

The executive said that “may be wishful thinking”.

“I may not be that lucky but that would be my desire,” Mr Cowan elaborated.

Originally published as Domino’s Pizza commits to net zero by 2050, pushing ahead with massive expansion plans

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Rollercoaster session for ASX, fails to hold onto post-Reserve Bank of Australia meeting rally



The ASX surged after the RBA flagged keeping the cash rate at its historic low for another two years, but couldn’t hold onto the gains.

The Australian sharemarket slumped lower despite positive overseas leads and after failing to hold onto its post Reserve Bank of Australia meeting rally.

The benchmark S&P/ASX200 index closed 0.63 per cent lower at 7324.3, while the All Ordinaries Index erased 0.59 per cent to 7646.6.

Ord Minnett said US stocks rose overnight in generally lacklustre trade, as investors looked ahead to the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy meeting on Wednesday, while European stocks hit record highs as expectations of interest rate hikes supported bank stocks.

CommSec analyst Steven Daghlian said the local bourse started out in the green but faded as investors traded tentatively awaiting the outcome of our own central bank’s monthly board meeting.

OMG chief executive Ivan Tchourilov said it had been a rollercoaster, with the ASX gaining ground after the RBA determined to keep the cash rate on hold, as expected, while noting higher than expected inflation.

“The Reserve did well to remain ambiguous on expectations, although we’re still looking at a 2023 interest rate hike instead of the previous 2024 forecast,” Mr Tchourilov said.

“Commodity prices were mixed, as was our resources sector.”

After iron ore prices slumped, Rio Tinto lost 2.54 per cent to $88.66, BHP dropped 2.34 per cent to $35.56, Fortescue shed 2.65 per cent to $13.95 and Champion Iron sank 7.22 per cent to $4.24.

Nickel miner IGO plunged 8.42 per cent to $8.92, while Whitehaven Coal plummeted 9.54 per cent to $2.37.

Origin Energy slid 1.95 per cent to $5.02, while Beach Energy dropped 3.93 per cent to $1.34 after announcing its managing director and chief executive Matt Kay had handed in his resignation to pursue other opportunities.

But battery minerals company Magnis Energy Technologies was a stellar performer, rocketing 18.48 per cent to 54.5 cents.

“Magnis released their annual report after market close yesterday and the market is starting to see some value in Magnis’ proposition,” Mr Tchourilov said.

“Despite operating at a loss without a finished product, they have $665m in binding offtake sales lined up for 2022.

“The patented battery technology is gaining traction in the US market, where a new battery plant is being built in New York to meet demand.

“Magnis has already returned 280 per cent in share price this year, but will be one to watch especially closely into 2022 when battery production begins to ramp up.”

Insurance providers retreated after Insurance Australia Group downgraded its full-year guidance, upping its assumptions for hail and severe storm impacts in South Australia and Victoria last month to $1.045bn, from $765m previously.

“Cost allowances for natural perils have been lifted significantly after the first quarter came in more expensive than expected,” Mr Tchourilov said.

“Margin guidance for the period has slipped a full 3 per cent and they’re allowing room for extreme weather events to continue into next year.

“IAG is maintaining strong underlying performance as reported in its end of year results. However, if the first quarter is anything to go by, it will be an expensive year for insurance providers.”

IAG shares tumbled 7.03 per cent to $4.50, while Suncorp gave up 4.15 per cent to $11.31 and QBE softened 2.39 per cent to $11.83.

Financial technology platform provider Praemium Ltd leapt 14.46 per cent to $1.42 after knocking back Netwealth Group’s $785m takeover offer, saying the bid did not appropriately value its current performance and near-term trajectory.

Wealth manager Netwealth gave up 2.06 per cent to $17.15.

ANZ fell 1.1 per cent to $27.84, Commonwealth Bank backtracked 0.5 per cent to $105.76, National Australia Bank declined 0.88 per cent to $28.20 and Westpac slumped 2.73 per cent to $23.13 a day after releasing disappointing full-year results.

However, Morningstar equity analyst Nathan Zaia said Westpac could fix its productivity issues, noting it was the cheapest of the major banks.

Property stocks fared well, with Goodman Group surging 5.57 per cent to $23.49 after upgrading its full-year guidance, while Charter Hall Group rose 3.28 per cent to $18.59 after doing the same on Monday, while Lendlease added 2.39 per cent to $10.70.

Mr Daghlian said Goodman, the largest industrial property group on the ASX, which operates in 17 countries, was pocketing higher earnings partly because of demand for warehouses had surged during the pandemic-driven e-commerce boom.

Meal kit delivery service Marley Spoon continued to tumble after downgrading its full-year guidance last week, sinking 11.9 per cent to 92.5 cents.

The Aussie dollar was fetching 74.76 US cents, 54.76 British pence and 64.4 Euro cents in afternoon trade.

Originally published as Rollercoaster session for ASX, fails to hold onto post-Reserve Bank of Australia meeting rally




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Scott Morrison branded a gaslighter over leaked Macron texts



Scott Morrison has been accused of gaslighting a world leader as the diplomatic fallout over a cancelled submarine deal rages on.

Scott Morrison has been accused of gaslighting Emmanuel Macron, in a stinging attack from opposition leader Anthony Albanese.

Text messages between the French President and Mr Morrison on Monday were sensationally leaked on Monday evening, ratcheting up the tensions between the two leaders.

Mr Albanese said it was an “extraordinary step” for the Prime Minister to take.

“The attempted damage control by selectively leaking private text messages is quite an extraordinary step for an Australian Prime Minister to take,” Mr Albanese said.

“Leaders of countries and indeed people in their everyday life need to be able to engage in a professional way.

“And the leaking of this selected text message isn’t the first time that we’ve seen that occur from this Prime Minister.”

The strategically released messages sought to discredit Mr Macron’s version of events as the fracas over a cancelled $90bn submarine contract rages on.

Asked on Monday by Australian reporters if Mr Morrison had lied to the French President, Mr Macron said, “I don’t think. I know.”

But less than 24 hours later, private text messages between the two world leaders were made public.

In the messages, Mr Macron is reported to have asked Mr Morrison if he should expect “good or bad news for our joint submarine ambitions” ahead of the AUKUS agreement announcement.

Quizzed about the text disclosure later, Mr Morrison did not deny they were leaked.

“I am not going to indulge your editorial on it,” he said in Glasgow.

“What I will simply say is this. We were contacted when we were trying to set up the call. (The French President) made it pretty clear he was concerned that this would be a phone call that could result in a decision by Australia not to proceed.”

Earlier in the day, Mr Morrison claimed he had informed Mr Macron the conventional submarines being provided by France would not meet Australia’s national interest.

He later added he would not accept questioning of “Australia’s integrity”.

“I must say that I think the statements that were made questioning Australia’s integrity and the slurs that have been placed on Australia, not me, I’ve got broad shoulders,” Mr Morrison said.

“I can deal with that. But those slurs, I’m not going to cop sledging at Australia. I’m not going to cop that on behalf of Australians.”

His inference that France has slurred Australians in Mr Macron’s critique was a sticking point for Mr Albanese.

“Pretending also, the personal criticism of him is criticism of Australia, is using our nation as a human shield,” he added.

“Scott Morrison isn‘t the first leader to see himself as synonymous with his nation … Well, the news for Scott Morrison is he isn’t the state of Australia.”

Originally published as Scott Morrison branded a gaslighter over leaked Macron texts

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Scott Morrison meets with ‘dear friend’ Narendra Modi at Cop26



After a series of frosty encounters at the G20 summit in Rome, Scott Morrison has finally found a mate at Cop26.

Scott Morrison has been thanked for being a “dear friend” to India on the sidelines of the Cop26 climate summit in Glasgow.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday morning took to Twitter to declare there is never “a dull moment” when he’s with his friend Mr Morrison.

It came just hours after he praised the Australian medical regulator’s decision to recognise India’s locally produced Covid-19 vaccine Covaxin.

Mr Morrison later tweeted it was “wonderful” to see his friend at Cop26.

As the G20 leaders’ summit kicked off last week, Australia and India were joined only by China to resist a global bid to phase out coal-fired power and mining.

In his address to the Cop26 summit, Mr Modi committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2070 – two decades later than the rest of the world.

The announcement falls short of a key goal of the climate summit, which is for nations to agree to net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

India is the world’s fourth biggest emitter of carbon dioxide after China, the US and the EU.

It is the fifth largest export market for Australian coal, and imports into the country have risen off the back of Australian trade woes with China.

Mr Modi also promised his nation would transition to generating 50 per cent of its energy from renewables by 2030.

The Indian leader made the most of his time at the UN leaders’ summit, whizzing around to meet with several of his international counterparts.

Earlier, the Indian Prime Minister was pictured with UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Prince Charles.

He thanked the royal for his commitment to sustainable development and climate change.

Originally published as Scott Morrison meets with ‘dear friend’ Narendra Modi at Cop26

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Malcolm Turnbull says Scott Morrison’s ‘duplicity’ was ‘shameful’ over French subs deal



Malcolm Turnbull says his successor should have had an ‘honest and open’ conversation about Australia’s nuclear future before breaking decades of diplomatic trust.

Former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull has slammed Scott Morrison for his “sneaky, “shameful” and “duplicitous” behaviour that has strained Australia’s diplomatic relationship with France.

Speaking from the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, Mr Turnbull said Mr Morrison “should apologise” for “double dealing” the French over the submarine deal.

Mr Turnbull’s comments come after a day of back-and-forth between Mr Morrison and French President Emmanuel Macron, who accused Mr Morrison of lying about dumping their $90bn submarine contract in favour of a nuclear powered pact with the US and the UK.

Less than 24 hours after the public accusation, private text messages, presumably leaked from the Prime Minister’s Office, emerged, essentially undermining Mr Macron’s statement.

Speaking from Glasgow, Mr Morrison said he “would not cop a sledging” from Mr Macron and he had tried to set up a call with him before the AUKUS announcement in September that led to the diplomatic fallout.

“(Mr Macron) made it pretty clear he was concerned that this would be a phone call that could result in a decision by Australia not to proceed,” Mr Morrison said from Glasgow.

Mr Turnbull said Mr Morrison should cease hitting back and apologise.

“Firstly, because he did very elaborately and duplicitously deceive France,” he said.

“We had a relationship of the deepest trust and confidence with France – the French shared with us some of their most secret technology on submarines. It was a partnership between two nations as a cornerstone of France-Indo-Pacific strategy and to be double dealing with them the way Morrison did was shameful.

“I mean (US President) Joe Biden has acknowledged that.

“Morrison’s conduct has done enormous damage.”

Mr Morrison told reporters in Glasgow that during dinner in June with Mr Macron he had clearly told the French President that conventional submarines would no longer meet Australia’s strategic interests and any decision to transition to nuclear-powered ships would be in Australia’s national interests.

“The (French) submarine contract was a significant investment decision taken five years ago. At that point … the attack class submarine was the right decision,” Mr Morrison said from Glasgow.

“But there have been significant changes which have completely changed the game.”

Mr Turnbull said Mr Morrison should have dealt with Mr Macron “honestly” instead of “dropping hints”.

“What we should have done, and nuclear propulsion for submarines has always been an option for us … but what we should have done was had an honest and open conversation,” Mr Turnbull said.

“An honest person would have sat down with France, brought in the Americans … and said ‘look, we think we should move to nuclear propulsion’.

“The French submarine that we were working on was actually designed as a nuclear submarine and it was Australia’s request that it had conventional diesel electric propulsion.

“All Scott needed to do was to be honest and open, and that’s exactly what Biden has criticised him for because there wasn’t consultation.

“ If we had had an honest and open conversation, we wouldn’t have any of these problems. This is all the product of Scott’s duplicity.”

Originally published as Malcolm Turnbull says Scott Morrison’s ‘duplicity’ was ‘shameful’ over French subs deal

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Scott Morrison addresses Emmanuel Macron nuclear submarines deal fallout at COP26



Scott Morrison has issued a blistering response after French President Emmanuel Macron accused him of lying.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has sensationally rebuked Emmanuel Macron after the French president called him a liar.

Mr Morrison told reporters in Glasgow on Monday night that he made no apology for his decision to abandon a $90 billion submarine contract with France.

Mr Macron had accused Mr Morrison of lying by not revealing that Australia had been in talks with the UK and US over the acquisition of nuclear submarines.

Mr Macron made the extraordinary comment to Australian reporters at the G20 summit in Rome, after weeks of escalating diplomatic tensions between France and Australia.

“I just say when we have respect, you have to be true and you have to behave in line and consistent with this value,” he said.

When asked if he thought Mr Morrison had lied to him, he said: “I don’t think, I know”.

In response, Mr Morrison said he did not wish to “personalise the spat” but would not accept “statements questioning Australia’s integrity”.

“I’m not going to cop sledging on Australia,” he told reporters.

He said the conventional diesel submarines that would have been built under the deal with France would not have met Australia’s strategic needs.

“I have to put Australia’s interests before any interests that involved potentially offending others,” he said.

“The (French) submarine contract was a significant investment decision taken five years ago. At that point, given the strategic circumstance, time and technology available to Australia the attack class submarine was the right decision.

“But there have been significant changes that have occurred in our strategic environment in the Indo-Pacific, which completely changed the game.”

Mr Morrison laid out a timeline about when Australia pulled out of the deal.

The Prime Minister provided a blow-by-blow of when he raised concerns, touching on when he raised issues with the French contract, including significant delays.

Mr Morrison said he acted to abandon the deal in Australia’s national interests, and Mr Macron was given some advance warning the French deal was not working.

He said French officials had attempted to appease Australia’s concerns, without success.

Both leaders have been at the G20 summit and are now in Glasgow for the COP26 Climate Change conference.

More to come

Originally published as Morrison says ‘I won’t cop sledging on Australia’ amid nuclear subs fallout

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‘Scott no friends’: Scott Morrison mocked for G20 photo



We’ve all experienced an awkward moment before a family photo, but Scott Morrison’s was broadcast live around the world.

The Prime Minister has been mocked for being a “Scott no friends” after an awkward moment at the G20 which even saw him snubbed by an old friend.

After a frosty phone call with French President Emmanuel Macron on the way to the leaders’ summit, Scott Morrison was left without a friend to chat to during the “family photo”.

West Australian MP Patrick Gorman took to Twitter on Monday to make hay of the matter at the Prime Minister’s expense.

Speaking with NCA Newswire, the Labor MP said Mr Morrison has form when it comes to political photo ops.

“It is hard to see someone go through their awkward teenage phase in the middle of the G20,” Mr Gorman said.

“In a week’s time, Scott Morrison will get a poll telling him this was funny and he will laugh at it, too.

“World leaders saw what happened last time he hugged Malcolm Turnbull, Emmanuel Macron and Donald Trump.”

In video from the meeting, it appeared several world leaders snubbed Mr Morrison as he approached them as they gathered in front of cameras.

Walking onto the podium, the Prime Minister was given the cold shoulder by Rwanda President Paul Kagame and South Korea President Moon Jae-In, who did not seem receptive to a three-way handshake.

Mr Morrison then approached old friend and long-time parliamentary ally Mathias Cormann, who should have been a sure bet for a chat.

But his former finance minister looked to his feet before turning away from the Prime Minister, before the two could exchange pleasantries.

The interaction was made all the more awkward because Mr Morrison strongly supported and campaigned for Mr Cormann to become secretary-general of the OECD.

To add to Mr Morrison’s woes, US President Joe Biden and Mr Macron could be seen enthusiastically chatting before the picture.

It’s not the first time Mr Morrison has had an awkward encounter on the world stage.

At the G7 summit in Biarritz, Mr Morrison was left out in the cold, looking down at his phone, while other leaders chatted happily away while getting in formation for the photo.

But there is still a chance for the Prime Minister to redeem himself with his peers, as the UN climate summit gets underway in Glasgow this week.

He’ll be hoping Australia’s net zero commitment will be enough to convince his stately colleagues he is serious about tackling climate change, but only time will tell.

Originally published as ‘Scott no friends’: ScoMo mocked for awkward G20 photo

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Golf news; Australian Lucas Herbert has won the US PGA Tour Bermuda Championship



In his first year season on the US PGA Tour Australian young gun Lucas Herbert has had a massive win with more than the million dollar reward.

A $1.5 million payday was just the start of the “unbelievable” rewards for Australian Lucas Herbert with a ticket to the Masters also secured after a maiden US PGA Tour win in his first season.

The 25-year-old from Bendigo, who won the Irish Open on the European Tour earlier this year, is now set to break in to the world top 50 which would earn him a start at Augusta after defeating 2018 Masters winner Patrick Reed and New Zealand’s Danny Lee by a shot to secure the Bermuda Championship.

“I mean, it’s pretty unbelievable,” Herbert said after his win at Port Royal Golf Course.

“Definitely gets me into the Masters? Okay. I mean, the next 12 months are going to be really cool. I‘ve never played Augusta, so being able to play the Masters is going to be pretty cool.

“I don‘t even want to try to put expectations on anything right now.”

The victory also secures Herbert, who earned his first PGA Tour card earlier this year, secures the Victorian a two-year-playing exemption.

“So I think the next few days we’ll sit back and think and celebrate and then, yeah, reset some plans going forward as to what our goals are going to be and how we want to play in some of these awesome tournaments that we’re going to get into,” he said.

“Getting to play in — we just talked about Kapalua, getting to play in a few of these events that I‘ve watched growing up on TV, it’s just going to be a cool experience. No matter how I play, it’s just going to be phenomenal to play in those tournaments. It’s going to be lots of fun.”

Herbert mixed four birdies with two bogeys in his closing round to post a 15-under 72-hole total as unheralded American third-round leader Taylor Penrith crashed with a horror five-over 76.

Reed reeled off four birdies in the last six holes in a six-under 65 to share second spot with New Zealand‘s Danny Lee, who couldn’t manage better than even par in his final round.

“ Just so hard out there today and I just, it was one of those ones you couldn‘t even let yourself kind of get ahead and think that you‘ve won the tournament early because conditions were just so brutal that you could have hit a shot anywhere at any time offline and it was just, it was just good to survive I guess is probably the way to describe it,” Herbert said after collecting the winner’s purse of $1.55 million.

“It was probably more of a survival mode, just try and get yourself into position off the tee and in the fairway hopefully and in the middle of the greens and just, you know, try not to put too much pressure on the short game because, yeah, it was just obviously not easy out there.

“Obviously it made everything play tougher and I really enjoyed the challenge out there, to be honest. It‘s not easy playing in that wind and weather. As long as you keep the right attitude and smile and laugh and just enjoy that challenge.”

Originally published as Australian Lucas Herbert has had a million dollar payday at the Bermuda Championship and is on track for the Masters




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International travel: Rules for Australian flights as border opens



Families will be able to reunite, and Aussies will be able to explore the world again after international travel opens back up tomorrow. Here are the rules you need to follow.

After more than a year and half of being closed of from the rest of the world, Australians will finally be able to travel overseas again from Monday.

But international holidays will look very different from what they used to.

The ongoing complications of Covid-19 will mean travellers will need to be extremely organised and informed about the rules and requirements of their destination country before they can even set foot on the plane.

Australian Traveller founder Quentin Long warned Aussie travellers that planning their trip would be no easy task.

“It is really, really complex,” Mr Long told the Today show on Friday.

“My No. 1 piece of advice is use a travel agent because they will know all of the rules and protocols.

“They will be able to tell you, for example, does the airline require you to have a PCR test even if you don’t need it to arrive in the country. Those sort of complexities are what we are facing and you will needs a much happen as possible.”

But for Aussies who are hesitant to fork out the funds on a travel agent, a self-guided trip will be difficult, but certainly not impossible.

Below are the rules and restrictions for Australia’s favourite overseas destinations from next month.

Leaving Australia

Only fully vaccinated Australians will be permitted to travel overseas without an exemption from November 1.

Travellers will need to provide evidence of their vaccination status when they check-in at the airport with an Australian-issued International Covid-19 Vaccination Certificate (ICVC).

Children under 12 and people who can’t be vaccinated for medical reasons will be treated the same as fully-vaccinated travellers.

If you are over 12 and not fully vaccinated, you will need to apply for an exemption to leave Australia.

United Kingdom

Fully vaccinated Australians will be able to travel to the UK without having to quarantine from November 1.

The UK will only consider travellers 14 days after their second Covid-19 vaccine.

Fully-vaccinated travellers do no need to test negative for Covid-19 before boarding their plane to the UK.

Upon arrival in the UK, travellers will need to get a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test within 48 hours and test negative for Covid-19.

The UK will allow unvaccinated and partially vaccinated Australians to enter their borders, but travellers will be required to follow an extensive set of rules.

Before arriving in the UK, travellers will need to have a Covid-19 test with a negative result taken within 3 days before they depart Australia.

Travellers will also need to complete a passenger locator form before departing Australia, along with booking and pay for two PCR tests and 10 nights of accommodation for quarantine once they arrive in the UK.

One they arrive in the UK, unvaccinated and partially travellers will need to quarantine for 10 days and test negative for Covid-19 on day 2 and day 8 of quarantine.

US and Canada

Fully vaccinated Australians will be able to travel to the US and Canada without having to quarantine from November 8.

For travel to the US, the full vaccination requirement applies to anyone over 18. For Canada, it applies to anyone over 12.

All travellers must have had their second vaccine shot 14 days before entry.

Any Australians who have travelled to the UK, Ireland or the Schengen zone (26 European countries including Italy, Germany and Greece) within the past 14 days will not be permitted to enter the US or Canada.

Before boarding their flight to the US or Canada, travellers must be able to provide proof of a negative Covid-19 PCR test result. The test must have been taken within 72 hours before departure.

For travellers to Canada, a ArriveCAN application, which includes your travel and contact information, quarantine plan and Covid-19 symptom self-assessments, must also be submitted before departure.

Once arriving in the US or Canada, travellers are not required to complete another Covid-19 test.

Australians cannot use land, rail and ferry crossings to travel over the US-Canada border.

Unvaccinated and partially vaccinated Australians will not be permitted to travel to the US or Canada unless it is for an approved reason.

Singapore

Fully vaccinated Australians will be able to travel to Singapore without having to quarantine from November 8.

All travellers must have had their second Covid vaccine shot 14 days before entry.

Children under 12 are exempt from Singapore’s vaccine requirement.

Before booking a trip, travellers will need to apply for a Vaccinated Travel Pass (VTP) to enter as a short-term visitor under Singapore’s Vaccinated Travel Lane (VTL).

Applications for VTPs open for Australians on November 1.

Before boarding their flight to Singapore, travellers must be able to provide proof of a negative Covid-19 PCR test result. The test must have been taken within 48 hours before departure.

Upon arrival in Singapore, travellers are required to have another Covid-19 PCR at the airport.

After this, travellers will have to stay in a hotel approved by Singapore health authorities for one night as they wait to receive a negative test result.

As a popular layover destination, Australian travellers will need to be mindful of Singapore’s rules about other countries outside of Australia.

Layovers will not be permitted for any Australian travellers who have visited any country outside of Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, the UK, US or Switzerland in the past 14 days.

Thailand

Fully vaccinated Australians will be able to travel to Singapore without having to quarantine from November 1.

Thailand considers travellers fully vaccinated 14 days after completing a course of the Covid-19 vaccine.

Children under 12 are exempt from Thailand’s vaccine requirement.

Before boarding their flight to Thailand, travellers must be able to provide proof of a negative Covid-19 PCR test result. The test must have been taken within 72 hours before departure.

Travellers must also provide proof of travel health insurance covering health care and treatment expenses for Covid-19 with a coverage of no less than 100,000 USD before boarding their flight.

Upon arrival in Thailand, travellers are required to have another Covid-19 PCR at the airport.

After this, travellers will have to stay in a hotel approved by Thai health authorities for one night as they wait to receive a negative test result.

Unvaccinated and partially vaccinated Aussie travellers will also be permitted to travel to Thailand, but must complete either ten or 14 days quarantine upon arrival.




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